Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog

March 4th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Early-Career Scientists and Clinicians – Would you like to better navigate the clinical practice-research divide in the world of Big Data?

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young

Apply for a NIH-funded week-long “Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K)” fellowship and bridge the gap

BD2K Linked In Graphic 640x400

Within “Big Data,” there’s a multidimensional data goldmine just waiting for collaborative research teams to enter and extract information that can change the world of health care. Many face the challenge and wonder how they can use that data to improve health and health care delivery.

If you’re looking for direction, the Big Data Coursework for Computational Medicine (BDC4CM) week can provide the GPS coordinates to get you there. Course will include in-depth lectures, case studies and hands-on training from renowned, multidisciplinary faculty.

 

When: July 13-18, 2015
Where: Rochester, [...]

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Tags: Big Data, CCaTS, CTSA, Kern center, research fellowship

February 27th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Submit Abstracts Now for Delivery Science Summit 2015

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young

http://deliverysciencesummit.mayo.edu/

You are invited to submit an abstract now for Delivery Science Summit 2015.

Hosted by Mayo Clinic's Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, the conference will be held at the Mayo Civic Center, Sept. 16-18, 2015, in Rochester, Minnesota.

You will learn best practices, gain innovative perspectives, network and set the stage for future collaboration as we collectively improve health care.

Submit your abstract now and share your research accomplishments with colleagues across the continuum of health care delivery. The submission deadline is April 27, 2015.

Sign up for Summit updates. [...]

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Tags: abstracts, conference, Delivery Science Summit, health care delivery, Kern center, Science of health care delivery

February 6th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Dr. Mark Allen to head Society of Thoracic Surgeons

By Bob Nellis

Mark Allen, M.D.

Mark Allen, M.D.

Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Mark S. Allen, M.D., has been elected president of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons during the society’s annual meeting in San Diego.

Dr. Allen is a professor of surgery at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. His research at Mayo includes serving as principal investigator for a study examining whether removing all lymph nodes in the chest is more effective than removing lymph nodes selectively in patients with stage I or stage II non-small cell lung cancer; the trial is supported by the National Cancer Institute and American College of Surgeons. [...]

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Tags: Dr Mark Allen, society of thoracic surgeons, Surgery

February 3rd, 2015 · 2 Comments

“One Size Fits All” Doesn’t Apply to Quality Improvement

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young

QualityIn an era of rising health care costs, and continuing efforts to improve value for patients nationwide, we have seen the rise of a number of quality improvement and reporting efforts. In his study, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, David Etzioni, M.D., and his team, illustrated that seeking a standardized solution is unlikely to provide a universal result.

The research team found no difference in postoperative outcomes over time between University HealthSystem Consortium hospitals with and without participation in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP).

These findings demonstrate the complexity and limitations of mandating use of national outcomes reporting structures such as NSQIP [...]

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Tags: American College of Surgeons, improvement, Kern center, NSQIP, quality, surgical outcomes, value, health care delivery, Science of health care delivery

January 19th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Heart Disease: Understanding the Connection

By Bob Nellis

cardio-rheumPhysicians have long known that people with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic conditions such as lupus are more likely to die at younger ages than are those without these conditions. Even with advances in treatment, the gap in life expectancy remains.

No one knew why until 15 years ago. That’s when researchers at Mayo Clinic helped establish that people with rheumatoid arthritis have a greater chance of developing various types of cardiovascular disease.

“We now know that rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an increased risk of heart and vascular disease,” says senior researcher Sherine E. Gabriel, M.D., a rheumatologist and epidemiologist in

Sherine Gabriel, [...]</p/>
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Tags: Cardiology, Discovery's Edge, Heart Disease, rheumatoid arthritis

January 16th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Collaborating to Enhance Patient Experience

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young

CSHCD

The best interest of the patient is the only interest to be considered, and in order that the sick may have the benefit of advancing knowledge, union of forces is necessary- Dr. William J. Mayo, 1910

The motivation behind Mayo Clinic's many collaborative relationships is to improve patient care. These relationships are focused on finding better ways to engage patients and families in shared decision making; by identifying and implementing best practices to reduce costs and improve outcomes; by inventing new ways to deliver care through new technologies, new treatments, and developing new models of care delivery.

Collaboration starts at Mayo Clinic through the multidisciplinary, integrated care delivery model, with specialists and primary care providers, researchers and [...]

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Tags: Big Data, collaboration, Optum Labs, partnerships

January 15th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

A Line in the Sand – Mayo Clinic’s Role in Early Insulin Research

By Bob Nellis

Line_in_the_SandEarly in the 20th century, a desperate group of patients began appearing at Mayo Clinic in the hope that the specialists there could keep them alive. Mostly children and younger adults, they had been afflicted with a condition that only years before would have been a death sentence — type I diabetes.

Doctors at Mayo, led by endocrinologist and researcher Russell Wilder, M.D., and a handful of other centers across the country had found a drastic, but feasible method of saving many of them from this deadly disease. Dr. Wilder and his colleague, Walter Boothby, M.D., had formulated a special ketogenic diet.

Consisting of a precise proportion of carbohydrates, proteins and fats determined by [...]

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Tags: diabetes, Endocrinology, history, Insulin, Mayo Clinic, medical history, Research

January 5th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

The Next Generation of Biomedical Researchers: Torn by Irresistible Forces

By Bob Nellis

Katie Hartjes, Mayo graduate student

Katie Hartjes, Mayo graduate student

Hours of study, lectures to attend, research to complete, labs to monitor, data to analyze, papers to write, new solutions to old problems to noodle on. It’s just another day in the life of a biomedical research student. The to-do list never seems to end. Morning to night, seven days a week.

 The path to becoming a biomedical researcher is not for the fainthearted. It requires years of study, an insatiable curiosity and unflagging persistence in the face of failure.

 A Ph.D. candidate at Mayo Graduate School, Katherine A. Hartjes says traveling that long road has been worth it. She has [...]

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Tags: biomedical research, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Graduate School, research education

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