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September 14th, 2017

Research News Roundup–August 2017

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young

The Mayo Clinic Research News Roundup includes brief summaries and links to research news releases from the past month. It also connects readers to related resources. Read on for more information from Mayo Clinic Research.

August 2017

For the first time, Mayo Clinic researchers and colleagues present data on how nervous system tumors, called neuroblastomas, spread.  Their paper, published in Cancer Cell, clarifies the relationship between two genes that fuel the aggressive spread of neuroblastomas.

Neuroblastoma is a cancer that most commonly affects children age 5 or younger, though it may rarely occur in older children.

Z-endoxifen, a potent derivative of the drug tamoxifen, could itself be a new treatment for the most common form of breast cancer in women with metastatic disease. This finding was reported from a clinical trial conducted by researchers at Mayo Clinic and the National Cancer Institute, and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

new study published in MenopauseThe Journal of The North American Menopause Society has found that low-dose hormone therapy may be effective in easing sleep issues for women in perimenopause and early menopause. The goal of the study was twofold: find out how two forms of hormone therapy affect sleep quality and assess the ties between hot flashes, sleep quality and hormone therapy.

new study has found that a condition that threatens the lives of some pregnant women and the fetus may continue to put the mother at risk later in life.Mayo Clinic researchers found that women with a history of pre-eclampsia are more likely to face atherosclerosis – hardening and narrowing of the arteries – decades after their pregnancy. The findings are published in the September issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Mayo Clinic researchers have reported a causal link between senescent cells – the cells associated with aging and age-related disease – and bone loss in mice. Targeting these cells led to an increase in bone mass and strength. The findings appear online in Nature Medicine.

Mayo Clinic researchers have identified a new cause of treatment resistance in prostate cancer. Their discovery also suggests ways to improve prostate cancer therapy. The findings appear in Nature Medicine.

In the publication, the authors explain the role of mutations within the SPOP gene on the development of resistance to one class of drugs. SPOP mutations are the most frequent genetic changes seen in primary prostate cancer. These mutations play a central role in the development of resistance to drugs called BET-inhibitors.

Mayo Clinic researchers, along with colleagues at the University of Iowa, report that a human gut microbe discovered at Mayo Clinic may help treat autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. The findings appear in Cell Reports.


Find research feature stories, videos and news on Discovery's Edge, Mayo Clinic's online research magazine.

Cancer-related stories of hope and healing can be found in Forefront, the online version of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center's magazine.

Mayo Clinic Radio's 1-minute and in-depth discussions of research and practical patient information can be found online or via your local radio station.

Much of our content is available in Spanish as well.

Tags: Findings, Innovations, News, Progress Updates, Research News Roundup

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