Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog

Innovations Archive

May 26th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Improve Health of Pediatric Populations Using the Stepped Wedge Design

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young

  Robert Jacobson, M.D., is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota, and serves as the medical director for the Population Health Science Program at the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. He also leads Mayo’s Employee and […]

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: health care delivery, Kern center, pediatrics, population health, Robert Jacobson, Science of health care delivery, Yasaman Fatemi


May 19th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Single Biggest Concern: A Palliative Approach

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young

For people living with serious illness, both patients and care providers, identifying the single biggest concern can be a difficult task.  There are so many concerns – from “Who will help me if I am too weak to care for myself?” to “How can we treat my nausea and pain?”  When interrupted by a serious […]

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Bob Shannon, Cory Ingram, Jeff Sloan, Kern center, palliative care, patient reported outcomes, PROs, Ryan Utti, Science of health care delivery, Tom Fitch


April 29th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Catching Eye Problems Earlier with Technology

By Bob Nellis

A team of Mayo Clinic ophthalmologists have validated what they are calling a user-friendly computer program for pediatric vision testing. Tomohiko Yamada, O.D. and colleagues tested the the Jaeb Visual Acuity Screener (JVAS) – a computerized test — on 175 children between 3 and 7 years old. After that, they were also tested by an expert […]

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: eye diseases, eye research, ophthalmology, pediatrics, vision tests


April 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Quest for Alzheimer’s Disease Treatments: Mitochondria Renders Clues

By Bob Nellis

A research group led by Mayo Clinic neuroscientist Eugenia Trushina, Ph.D, has investigated whether treatment with a small molecule CP2 can prevent the debilitating effects of Alzheimer’s disease  in three animal models of familial Alzheimer’s, an inherited neurodegenerative disorder with symptoms of progressive cognitive decline in aging populations. There is no cure for Alzheimer’s in […]

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: AD, Alzheimer's, Alzheimer's disease, Eugenia Trushina, neuroscience


April 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Individualized Medicine’s Latest Computational Consortium

By Bob Nellis

Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine — with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Chicago — is establishing a National Science Foundation Industry/University Collaborative Research Center called the Center for Computational Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, or CCBGM. The goal is to study the applicability, timeliness, efficiency, and accuracy of the computational infrastructure […]

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: bioinformatics, Center for Individualized Medicine, computational genomics, genomics, medical genomics, Precision Medicine


March 20th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Hope for reversing multiple sclerosis

By Bob Nellis

In 1983, when Moses Rodriguez, M.D., established a small research lab to study multiple sclerosis (MS) at Mayo Clinic, he was told that he was wasting his time. Dr. Rodriguez, now an emeritus staff member, was trained as a physician in neurology. Adding basic science research to his portfolio would be impossible, he was told. […]

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: biomedical research, moses rodriguez, MS, multiple sclerosis, neurology, neurosciences


March 17th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Would You Get Screened for Cancer if You Could Do It At the Mall Instead of at the Hospital?

By Jon Ebbert, M.D.

Chronic heartburn can cause esophageal cancer. But people who suffer from heartburn often don’t get screened for cancer, and the results can be deadly. Heartburn can lead to a condition called “Barrett’s esophagus.” Barrett’s esophagus is a strong, and only known, risk factor for cancer of the esophagus.   New research conducted in collaboration with […]

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Barrett's esophagus, cancer screening, Endoscopy, mobile research vehicle


January 19th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Heart Disease: Understanding the Connection

By Bob Nellis

Physicians have long known that people with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic conditions such as lupus are more likely to die at younger ages than are those without these conditions. Even with advances in treatment, the gap in life expectancy remains. No one knew why until 15 years ago. That’s when researchers at Mayo Clinic […]

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Cardiology, Discovery's Edge, Heart Disease, rheumatoid arthritis


January 16th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Collaborating to Enhance Patient Experience

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young

“The best interest of the patient is the only interest to be considered, and in order that the sick may have the benefit of advancing knowledge, union of forces is necessary. – Dr. William J. Mayo, 1910 The motivation behind Mayo Clinic’s many collaborative relationships is to improve patient care. These relationships are focused on finding […]

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Big Data, collaboration, Optum Labs, partnerships, Kern center


January 15th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

A Line in the Sand – Mayo Clinic’s Role in Early Insulin Research

By Bob Nellis

Early in the 20th century, a desperate group of patients began appearing at Mayo Clinic in the hope that the specialists there could keep them alive. Mostly children and younger adults, they had been afflicted with a condition that only years before would have been a death sentence — type I diabetes. Doctors at Mayo, […]

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: diabetes, Endocrinology, history, Insulin, Matthew Clark PhD, medical history, Research