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Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog

Innovations

May 11th, 2017

Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Collaboration: Bringing Innovative Cell-Based Therapies to Patients

By Center for Regenerative Medicine m168659

Mayo Clinic’s Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia recently announced a collaboration to delay and prevent heart failure from HLHS, a rare and complex form of congenital heart disease in which the left side of a child’s heart is severely underdeveloped. The collaboration is part of a […]

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Tags: Center for Regenerative Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, HLHS, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pediatric heart transplant, stem cells, Timothy Nelson, Todd and Karen Wanek


May 9th, 2017

Increasing the Odds

By Lynda de Widt ldewidt

Increasing the Odds Mayo Clinic performs more transplants than any other organization in the country. That experience allows Mayo Clinic scientist-physicians to study stem cells and personalize drugs to fight organ rejection and increase the number of viable lungs. Immune-Building Stem Cell Research In the 1970s, when Cesar A. Keller, M.D., started his career in […]

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Tags: Alexander Parker, Center for Individualized Medicine, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Cesar Kellar, chronic organ rejection, Florida, Jacksonville, kidney transplant, lung restoration, lung transplant, Mark Stegall, regenerative medicine


April 27th, 2017

Developing new tests to find and defeat cancer at its earliest stages

By susanbuckles susanbuckles

Mammography and other screening tools have made great strides in finding cancer early, when it is most likely to be successfully treated. However, some early-stage cancers are missed by conventional screening and are only detected when symptoms occur. Mayo Clinic and other research institutions are wondering: could a blood test complement current practice to improve […]

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Tags: breast cancer, cancer, Center for Individualized Medicine, Dr. Celine Vachon, Dr. Fergus Couch, Dr. Minetta Liu, Precision Medicine


April 18th, 2017

Attack the Gap–New Immunotherapy May Help the Body Fight Ovarian Cancer

By Nicole Brudos Ferrara nicoleferrara

It was only when Kathi Schroeder took to the bone-chilling streets of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on her bike last January that she noticed something was not right. “I was having trouble breathing; just taking a deep breath was difficult,” she remembers. Kathi went to her local doctor’s office and was prescribed a round of antibiotics […]

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Tags: cancer vaccine, clinical trials, Dr. Matthew Block, Kathi Schroeder, ovarian cancer, TH17


March 14th, 2017

Exploration of six alternatives nets policy that cuts surgical delay and overtime

By Adam Harringa harringaadam

Study finds one strategy decreases overtime by 52 percent with same access for patients A few years back, the Mayo Clinic Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery approached Mayo scientists with a problem: a backlog of patients waiting for surgery. They wanted the scientists, in the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for […]

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Tags: Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, doctor burnout, health care delivery, health care systems engineering, Kern Center, Mayo Clinic research, medical research, patient access


March 9th, 2017

Researchers study benefits of stretching ‘microbreaks’ for surgeons

By Adam Harringa harringaadam

Many surgeons spend prolonged periods in awkward positions, which increases safety concerns for patients, and can lead to long term medical ailments and burnout for doctors. So Mayo Clinic researchers have a team of surgeons performing “microbreaks” of 90 seconds or two minutes of stretching every 20 to 40 minutes. The result for many surgeons […]

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Tags: doctor burnout, health care delivery, Mayo Clinic research, medical research, population health, surgical outcomes


February 16th, 2017

Yale and Mayo Clinic collaborate to further regulatory science

By Adam Harringa harringaadam

Author Kevin Lin, Yale Daily News staff Funded by a United States Food and Drug Administration grant of up to $6.7 million over two years, Yale and Mayo Clinic are establishing a Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation to advance regulatory science by developing tools to measure the safety and efficacy of FDA-regulated […]

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Tags: cersi, health care delivery, regulatory science, yale


February 9th, 2017

Paper, Paper, Paper, and all those little black dots!

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young elizabethzimmermann

Why are you asking me this again? What does this have to do with my visit today? What does my doctor do with all these forms? These questions, and others, led researchers in the Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery to consider the use of […]

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Tags: Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Dr. Ryan Uitti, EPROMS, Florida, Kern Center, patient reported outcomes, PROs


January 24th, 2017

Introducing the Sepsis and Shock Response Team, and other care-improving research outcomes

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young elizabethzimmermann

Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection. Typically, sepsis occurs in people who are already hospitalized, but is also diagnosed among patients who come to the emergency department. It is the most expensive condition treated in the U.S. In 2002, the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care […]

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Tags: American Journal of Medical Quality, Dr. Pablo Moreno, emergency department, Florida, Kern Center, Science of health care delivery, sepsis, Sepsis and Shock Response Team, Surviving Sepsis Campaign


January 5th, 2017

Stool DNA test added to colorectal screening

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young elizabethzimmermann

Updated guidelines make noninvasive colorectal cancer screening option available to millions.   The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has issued its final colorectal cancer screening recommendations for 2016. The task force assigns an overall “A” grade to colorectal cancer screening in people ages 50 to 75 and fully recommends several screening exams that now include […]

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Tags: Cologuard, colon cancer, David Ahlquist, Forefront, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force


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