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Cancer Researchers Begin Blog Series on Cures for Kidney Cancer

Posted on April 7th, 2014 by Bob Nellis

 

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Winston Tan, M.D.

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John Copland, III, Ph.D.

 

We’re Drs. Winston Tan and John “Al” Copland and we collaborate in pursuit of cures for kidney cancer.  Winston is a Mayo Clinic physician oncologist who treats kidney cancer patients and collaborates with Al, a Mayo scientist dedicated to kidney cancer research.

In talking with kidney cancer survivors and friends, we have been encouraged to begin a blog about our research efforts and discoveries in kidney cancer current FDA approved drugs are not cures.  They provide some survival benefit (in a small number of cases, long term). These treatments not only have a number of toxicities issues but also do not work permanently for patients. Thus, new therapies are desperately needed. In pursuit of new treatments, we have discovered new cancer genes (from the greater than 22,000 genes expressed in human body) that may lead to new treatments for kidney cancer and for other cancers where these genes occur. So much is still unknown for every cancer but we now have the technologies including genomic and functional genomic techniques to make impactful discoveries.

Today, we are introducing our blog series with new insights and discoveries into new genes and treatment options for kidney and related cancers. We will discuss with you cutting edge discoveries and share our struggles along the way as we make new discoveries. Join us in this new adventure as an interactive learning process. We all can participate together in asking and answering questions as well as bring new cutting edge data to this forum. We encourage you to post news & links of discoveries from around the world to this blog. Together, we’ll gain a better understanding of kidney cancer, cancer biology and move forward towards cures.

Our laboratory has several technologies and capabilities that allow us to link clinical observations to functional cancer biology that may lead to new drugs to treat multiple cancers.

  1. Technologies to examine gene and protein expression in patients’ tumor tissues.
  2. Patient derived cell lines – originating from surgically resected tumor tissues
  3. shRNA technology – silence a gene and determine if that gene in a patient’s cells promotes tumor growth and metastasis
  4. In silico drug screening and drug synthesis allowing us to develop new compounds that may become tomorrow’s drugs.
  5. Cell based and in vitro models to test compound specificity.

Thus, we can determine if a gene is elevated in a patient’s cancer tissue. If it is, we can test the cell line (developed from that patient’s tumor tissue) by silencing the gene. We then determine if the cells grow slower, don’t survive or don’t metastasize.  If any of one of these three is true, then the gene is an important target to consider developing a drug that blocks its cancer promoting activity. Thus, using these step-wise methods allows us to validate many important new cancer genes.

We have discovered over 30 new genes in kidney cancer that promote tumor growth. We recently published one of these genes, SCD1. We showed an SCD1 inhibitor leads to massive cell death and it can be combined with an FDA approved drug, temsirolimus leading to greater cell death. In our next blog, we will share our thoughts on developing this combination therapy for clinical trials. And later, we will share with you discoveries of a second gene from the 30 plus genes. This gene is as exciting as SCD1 having never been described before as a cancer gene! You can see that we much to share from our laboratory discoveries on new gene targets along with insights to patient care from Winston and other topics that you may suggest important to our conversation.

We do envision that our discoveries will benefit other cancers. We know that SCD1 is over  expressed in many cancers along with our second discovered gene. We have access to different types of cancer tumor tissues. From these tumor tissues, we develop patient tumor derived cell lines in the laboratory for breast, ovarian, prostate, bladder, brain, head & neck, lung, pancreatic and colon cancers as well as melanoma. We will examine these cancer cell lines for antitumor activity and share our results with you. Thus, we can test our gene discoveries for benefit against other cancers. In our next blog, we will also share with you other cancers that are growth inhibited by SCD1.

So, come on the journey with us. We hope to inspire and educate one another along the way to solving some deadly mysteries. Like a detective, we have some very exciting leads but don’t know where they will ultimately lead us or if we will solve the ultimate crime -death by cancer- and catch the gang members (genes gone bad). We have to go for it! Did you know that over 1.665 million Americans will be told “You have cancer” in 2014.  About 585,720 Americans will die this year. There is 545,600 minutes in a year. Think about this – 3 people every minute will become a cancer victim and one person every minute will be die in the U.S.A. On the world stage, 2014 estimated new cancer diagnoses will be 1,665,540 made and cancer deaths will be 1,333,249 (http://www.medindia.net/patients/calculators/world_cancer_clock.asp). This calculates to 11.8 deaths per minute around the world.  The need is urgent. We are called to action.

 

Volunteers Sought: People with HPV-positive Tonsil and Tongue Cancers

Posted on April 3rd, 2014 by Nicole Brudos Ferrara

http://youtu.be/3UetqTM9P5I

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is seeking volunteers for a clinical trial for patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) positive tonsil or tongue (oropharynx) cancer whose disease has not spread outside of the neck. The purpose of the study is to find out if reducing treatment time and dosage can control the cancer while decreasing short-term and long-term side effects associated with treatment.

Who is eligible?
You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

  • Have been diagnosed with HPV-positive tonsil or tongue (oropharynx) cancer.
  • Are 18 years of age or older.
  • Have never, or have almost never, smoked. (For medical professionals: Less than a 10 pack-year smoking history or less than a 10-year history of tobacco product use.)

 What does this study involve?
This trial will combine minimally invasive surgical techniques with a less intense radiation therapy and chemotherapy course.  The traditional course of treatment after surgery is six weeks of daily radiation therapy and possibly high-dose chemotherapy. This study will treat patients with two weeks of low-dose chemotherapy and twice-daily radiation. After receiving study treatment, patients will be followed for two years.

How can I get more information?
For more information, visit http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01932697 or call 507-538-7623.

Gregory Gores, M.D., Receives 2014 AGA Distinguished Mentor Award

Posted on March 27th, 2014 by Gina Chiri-Osmond

Gregory Gores 2014 WP

Congratulations to Gregory Gores, M.D., who recently received the 2014 American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Distinguished Mentor Award. Dr. Gores is the current Executive Dean for Research at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., responsible for the leadership and management of all Mayo research centers, divisions, programs, and other research activity. In assuming this role, Dr. Gores is recognized with the distinction of a named professorship: the Mr. and Mrs. Ronald F. Kinney Executive Dean for Research Honoring Ronald F. Kinney, Jr.

The American Gastroenterological Association is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, the AGA has grown to include more than 16,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice, and advancement of gastroenterology. If you’d like more information about the AGA, visit https://www.gastro.org.

Congratulations to Dr. Gores on receiving this high honor.

The Connection Between Teeth and Heart Surgery

Posted on February 28th, 2014 by Bob Nellis

We want to pass on some published Mayo Clinic research as reflected in the media this week. This one, from the Annals of Thoracic Surgery is especially interesting and useful to both physicians and patients alike.

HealthDay, Getting Teeth Pulled Before Heart Surgery May Pose Serious Risks by Randy Dotinga…In a small, retrospective study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that 8 percent of heart patients who did not wait to have teeth pulled suffered major adverse health outcomes, such as a heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or death. "Guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association label dental extraction as a minor procedure, with the risk of death or non-fatal heart attack estimated to be less than 1 percent," study co-author Dr. Mark Smith said in a statement. Additional coverage:  KSAZ Ariz.US News & World ReportFOX NewsMedicineNet.comForbes.comWMCTV.comFox5Vegas.com19ActionNews.com,WDAM.comHHS HealthFinder.gov,

Reversing Breast Cancer With Injectable Nanoparticles

Posted on January 2nd, 2014 by Admin

A Mayo Clinic researcher, along with collaborators from Harvard Medical School, developed a method to first identify a breast-cancer-promoting gene and then specifically target this gene with a nanoparticle-based, injectable therapy that reverses breast cancer in mice.  The results, published this week in Science Translational Medicine, may provide a first step in developing a new non-surgical treatment option for patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer.   

Milk ducts in cancer-prone mice are packed with tumor cells (deep purple cells, shown by arrow), causing the ducts to grow fatter. But milk ducts in mice treated with a gene-silencing nanoparticle remain mostly hollow (right, shown by arrows), like healthy ducts. Credit: Amy Brock

“Precancerous cells are at a tipping point, in which they could become full-blown cancer or not,"  says Mayo Clinic pharmacologist Hu Li, Ph.D., a co-first author on the study. "Our results show that, if we know the right target genes, it is possible to tip the balance in favor of a more normal cell state, preventing cancer progression, and improving survival outcomes.”

Identifying the Enemy

In order to identify the most-significant genes that were turning normal breast cells into tumor cells, the researchers developed a computational approach to identify cancer-related changes in regulatory genes which, in turn, control many other genes.  In theory, targeting such regulatory genes could have a dramatic effect, based on all of the downstream genes which would also be affected. The team zeroed in on a specific regulatory gene, HoxA1, as a driver of breast cancer in mice with a high rate of hereditary breast tumors.

A Nanoparticle Approach

To see if HoxA1 could be targeted to prevent further tumor development in these mice, the team decided to down-regulate HoxA1 within the breast tissue, specifically in the cells where the tumor develops.


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By injecting nanoparticles carrying a gene-silencing snippet of RNA directly into the nipple, Wyss Institute scientists delivered this therapy to the entire milk-duct network, breast cancer first gets started. Credit: Silva Krause and Amy Brock

To accomplish this, they used tiny, fat-based nanoparticles, which were coupled to molecules designed to specifically down-regulate HoxA1, and may be injected into the body.  Hoping to reduce toxicity, they decided to inject these nanoparticles directly into the breast ducts, specifically where the tumors form, rather than systemically, as others have tried in the past.

The result:  The researchers discovered that mice developed dramatically fewer tumors when treated with this novel therapy.  They also found that targeted depletion of HoxA1 appeared to reverse tumor characteristics, effectively tipping the cellular balance back to a normal cell state.

In the same way that HoxA1 was identified, the researchers say it may be possible to advance the technology to the point where doctors are able to identify the best therapeutic gene targets specific to an individual patient’s tumor, allowing for the design of tumor-specific and patient-specific therapeutic strategies.

The research was supported by the Department of Defense, SysCODE (Systems-based Consortium for Organ Design & Engineering), the National Institutes of Health, Susan G. Komen Foundation, the Wyss Institute at Harvad, and Mayo Clinic.

Study collaborators include Amy Brock, Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin; Silva Krause, Ph.D., Michael S. Goldberg, Ph.D., Marek Kowalski, and Donald E. Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., all of Harvard University; James J. Collins, Ph.D., of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston University, and Harvard University.

Dr. Hu Li, et al. Silencing HoxA1 by intraductal injection of siRNA lipidoid nanoparticles prevents mammary tumor progression in mice. 

-- by Debra Evans

Luring Cancer: Custom “Bait” Catches Recurrent Prostate Cancer

Posted on December 18th, 2013 by Admin

From Mayo Clinic's Discovery's Edge magazine

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Many prostate cancer survivors live in fear of being told that their cancer has returned. It’s even scarier to be told that the doctor knows the cancer is there because of rising PSA levels, but that he can’t find it. Doctors and patients alike know that early detection of the recurrent cancer is critical to the patient’s chance of beating it a second time.

The problem, however, is locating it.

A Mayo Clinic research team has developed a new imaging technique that can often find the recurrent disease months, if not years, earlier than other imaging techniques. Prostate cancer uses choline, a B-complex vitamin, as a building block. So when a minute amount of radioactively-labeled choline (choline C-11) is injected into a patient, it is quickly taken up by the cancer — like a fish rising to the bait.

The prostate cancer then emits radiation, allowing doctors to pinpoint its location. A positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is “able to tell where in the body this radiation is being emitted,” explains Mayo Clinic radiologist Val Lowe, M.D..

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Val Lowe, M.D.

Choline C-11 isn’t toxic, and the radioactive element is so minimal, it’s really not much of a pharmacologic safety issue, explains Dr. Lowe. “If you take a grain of sugar and divide it into 100 pieces, one of those pieces is enough to do a PET scan.”

As well as being safe, the PET scan takes little time. Once the radioactive element is added to the choline C-11, it has a very short shelf-life. The half-life of choline C-11 is only 20 minutes, meaning it loses half of its radioactivity every 20 minutes. Because the radioactivity is the imaging agent that allows the PET scanner to see the cancer, the agent must be used shortly after it’s made. It cannot be stored and shipped. It essentially must be manufactured on-site.

All told, it takes about 45 minutes to make choline C-11, and the scan itself takes only about 20 minutes. The results are analyzed and a report is typically ready half an hour after the scan is completed.


PET scan on right using choline C-11 makes early tumors highly visible compared to traditional image on left.

PET scan on right using choline C-11 makes early tumors highly visible compared to traditional image on left.

“For the first time ever, we will have a clear blueprint of where the patient stands, at a far earlier course in treatment failure,” says Eugene Kwon, M.D., a Mayo Clinic urologist. “It has basically ripped the curtain off the Wizard of Oz.”

At this time, Mayo Clinic is the only health care provider in the country authorized to do this test. But when filing with the FDA, Mayo Clinic waived all exclusivity. It wanted other sites in the country to be able to manufacture and use the drug to better serve their own patients.

The Radiation Limbo: How Low Can We Go?

Posted on December 2nd, 2013 by Admin

From Mayo Clinic's Discovery's Edge magazine

Reducing radiation exposure from CT scans has become one of the primary goals of Mayo Clinic’s CT Clinical Innovation Center. Dr. Cynthia McCollough and her colleagues are doing the Radiation Limbo: How low can they go without sacrificing image quality.

At a time when CT scans are being used with greater frequency, the work of Mayo researchers has cut the risk of exposure without sacrificing image quality or diagnostic capability.

Dr. McCollough is continually looking for ways to lower radiation exposures while maintaining the needed quality. A critical step in that process includes better defining what level of image quality is needed.

“We don’t always need pretty pictures,” says Dr. McCollough.  “We only need pictures that clearly show the disease or injury. For some conditions, a really low exposure of radiation can be used.”

To reduce the amount of radiation patients are exposed to, the CT Clinical Innovation Center takes several routes. “The most basic, low-tech thing we can do is to ‘right-size’ the dose,” says Dr. McCollough.

Mayo Clinic has developed a computerized set of electronic protocols that are centrally managed.  If an adjustment is made to a protocol, the correct, new information is instantly available at all 25 CT scanners on the Mayo Clinic campus in Rochester, Minn., as well as at all Mayo Clinic Health System sites, and the Mayo practices in Florida and Arizona.

A CT scan of a patient with a small, non-obstructing kidney stone. In the left image, the stone is visible (arrow); in the right image from a follow-up exam, acquired using 60 percent less radiation, the stone is still easily detected (arrow).

Much like the automatic exposure feature on a camera, CT scanners can now automatically adjust the radiation exposure that the patient receives based on the type of exam and the size of the patient. “Everything we're doing with dose reduction is to make sure patients get the exams they need at the lowest radiation doses,” says Dr. McCollough.

One area where use of medical radiation has increased dramatically in recent years is in cardiology.  It is also one of the areas that has seen significant decreases in the levels of radiation exposure. Dr. Charanjit Rihal, a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic, says the results have been encouraging. “We reduced the amount of radiation by at least 40 percent, and in some cases, by as much as 70 percent.”

Charanjit S. Rihal, M.D., the William S. and Ann Atherton Professor of Cardiology Honoring Robert L. Frye, M.D., is chair of cardiovascular diseases at Mayo Clinic.

Another of Dr. McCollough’s colleagues, Dr. Joel Fletcher a radiologist and the medical director of the CT Clinical Innovation Center, worked with the pediatric oncology group to lower the radiation dose for follow-up CT scans for children diagnosed with cancer who had completed treatment.

“We just kept turning down the dose until finally it was down to the lowest setting the scanner would run at,” says Dr. McCollough. With each setting, a pediatric radiologist would look at the scan to ensure that the image was still clear. “We try to do the limbo: you know, ‘How low can you go?’”

With education, new technology, and collaboration between physicists, radiologists, and other physicians, Mayo Clinic is answering that question.

Mayo Clinic's Fifty Years of Kidney Transplants – Part IV

Posted on November 25th, 2013 by Admin

Pioneers of Kidney Transplantation at Mayo Clinic

James H. DeWeerd, M.D.

The first transplant of a kidney took place in Saint Marys Hospital on Nov. 25, 1963. Surgeons George A. Hallenbeck, M.D., and James DeWeerd, M.D., headed a medical team that performed the first transplant, placing a kidney in a female patient. The patient’s half-sister was the donor. Mayo’s operation reflected a common theme in the early development of transplant medicine. The donor providing the kidney was a close relative of the recipient. That was important at the time to minimize rejection of the organ by the recipient’s body.

George A. Hallenbeck, M.D.

George Hallenbeck, M.D., had acquired a deep knowledge of physiology and an interest in experimental surgeries before he stood at that operating table. Dr. Hallenbeck also designed Mayo’s initial kidney transplant program. Once it began, he was named to direct Mayo’s Section of Tissue and Organ Transplantation. He subsequently headed the surgical teams for more than 40 kidney transplants.

Dr. Hallenbeck was among Mayo’s most accomplished surgeons and researchers. Besides a medical degree, he held a doctorate in physiology with specialty work in gastric secretions. During World War II, Dr. Hallenbeck worked on the physiology of acceleration for Mayo, and served on the U.S. Army’s development team for the famed “G-suit.” It was created to protect fighter pilots from blackouts under extreme flight conditions.

Frank C. Mann, M.D.

Frank C. Mann, M.D., and his Mayo Clinic laboratory were probing the science of kidney transplants in the 1920s, decades before surgeons performed the first patient operations. A surgical resident working with the laboratory drew several insights from the failure of transplanted kidneys. Carl S. Williamson, M.D., was among the early scientists to recognize a “blood-borne” factor that needed to be overcome to prevent rejections. In later remarks, Dr. Mann observed: “The successful transplantation of a healthy organ for a diseased one awaits the discovery of those biologic factors which prevent the survival of tissues of one individual when transplanted into the body of another individual.” Dr. Mann and his associates also pioneered surgical techniques for kidneys. Among them was the method developed by Dr. Williamson, which was used in the first kidney transplants on humans. Dr. Mann came to Mayo Clinic in 1914 as director of experimental medicine and retired in 1952.

Fifty Years of Kidney Transplants at Mayo Clinic

Posted on November 25th, 2013 by Admin

Fifty years ago, the prognosis for a patient with kidney failure was threatening to grim.

Transplants of kidneys from one person to another were not mainstream medicine. In fact, a transplant was so extraordinary that TIME magazine described the treatment as “the most daring of all.”

Kidney transplants still are serious operations today. But, since Mayo Clinic’s first transplant in 1963, the surgeries have become accepted medical practice. In many cases, transplantation now is the treatment of choice for patients whose kidneys are failing. It often is preferred over chronic “hemodialysis,” which relies on an artificial kidney outside the patient’s body to filter the blood and prolong life.

Mayo transplant teams have used advances in surgical techniques, drugs that suppress rejection and, of course, experience with thousands of patients to change a “daring” operation into a safe procedure.

Today at Mayo Clinic, a kidney transplant patient has a 98 percent chance of surviving one year; furthermore, the chance of surviving 10 years is in the mid-70 percent range. Continued progress in the field is accelerating the survival rate.

Timeline
1963 – First kidney transplant by Mayo Clinic surgeons, performed at Saint Marys Hospital.

1967 – First Mayo kidney transplant using organ from deceased donor.

1987 – First multiple-organ transplants involving kidneys. One paired a pancreas with a kidney and the other involved a liver.

1994 – Kidney transplants for children relocated to the newly opened Mayo Eugenio Litta Children’s Hospital.

1999 – Mayo Clinic surgeons acquire a kidney from a donor by laparoscopy for the first time. Mayo Rochester records its 2,000th kidney transplant. Mayo Clinic in Arizona begins transplanting kidneys.

2000 – Mayo Clinic opens The William J. von Liebig Transplant Center, a specialty clinic for organ transplants, in the 10th floor of the Charlton Building. Mayo Clinic in Florida starts a kidney transplant program.

2004 – Mayo Clinic reaches a milestone of 3,000 kidney transplants.

2013 – Mayo Clinic in Arizona completes its 2,000th kidney transplant.

2013 – Mayo Clinic celebrates 50 years of kidney transplants with more than 4,800 procedures.

 

Detecting and Treating Cancer Recurrence in Time

Posted on November 22nd, 2013 by Admin

A Mayo Clinic laboratory study has revealed a possible mechanism to stop recurrence of cancer in mice. The approach, involving screening and a second-line treatment, prevented cancer from coming back in most of the mice in the study in which recurrence would have happened. The findings appear in Nature Medicine.

It’s been long known that cancer tumors change their appearance or phenotype, as well as their genomic characteristics, to avoid the natural immune response from the host body. A collaborative international team led by Richard Vile, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic molecular medicine researcher, attempted to detect or anticipate that shift and then initiate a “pre-emptive strike” before the tumor fully evolves, thus preventing a relapse.

The researchers say the findings may lead to new methods of early cancer detection and “appropriately timed, highly targeted treatment of tumor recurrence irrespective of tumor type or initial treatment.”

The research was supported by the Richard M. Schulze Family Foundation, Mayo Clinic, Cancer Research UK, the National Institutes of Health, and a grant from Terry and Judith Paul.

Other collaborators in the research are: Timothy Kottke, Nicolas Boisgerault, Ph.D., Rosa Maria Diaz Ph.D, Diana Rommelfanger-Konkol Ph.D, Jose Pulido, M.D., Jill Thompson, Debabrata Mukhopadhyay, Ph.D., of Mayo Clinic; Oliver Donnelly, M.D., Alan Melcher, M.D. Ph.D., and Peter Selby, M.D. Ph.D., of Cancer Research UK; Roger Kaspar, Ph.D., TransDerm, Santa Cruz; Matt Coffey, Ph.D., Oncolytics Biotech, Calgary; Hardev Pandha, M.D. Ph.D., University of Surrey; Kevin Harrington, M.D. Ph.D., The Institute of Cancer Research, London.