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Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog


Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post · November 22nd, 2013

Detecting and Treating Cancer Recurrence in Time

A Mayo Clinic laboratory study has revealed a possible mechanism to stop recurrence of cancer in mice. The approach, involving screening and a second-line treatment, prevented cancer from coming back in most of the mice in the study in which recurrence would have happened. The findings appear in Nature Medicine.

It’s been long known that cancer tumors change their appearance or phenotype, as well as their genomic characteristics, to avoid the natural immune response from the host body. A collaborative international team led by Richard Vile, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic molecular medicine researcher, attempted to detect or anticipate that shift and then initiate a “pre-emptive strike” before the tumor fully evolves, thus preventing a relapse.

The researchers say the findings may lead to new methods of early cancer detection and “appropriately timed, highly targeted treatment of tumor recurrence irrespective of tumor type or initial treatment.”

The research was supported by the Richard M. Schulze Family Foundation, Mayo Clinic, Cancer Research UK, the National Institutes of Health, and a grant from Terry and Judith Paul.

Other collaborators in the research are: Timothy Kottke, Nicolas Boisgerault, Ph.D., Rosa Maria Diaz Ph.D, Diana Rommelfanger-Konkol Ph.D, Jose Pulido, M.D., Jill Thompson, Debabrata Mukhopadhyay, Ph.D., of Mayo Clinic; Oliver Donnelly, M.D., Alan Melcher, M.D. Ph.D., and Peter Selby, M.D. Ph.D., of Cancer Research UK; Roger Kaspar, Ph.D., TransDerm, Santa Cruz; Matt Coffey, Ph.D., Oncolytics Biotech, Calgary; Hardev Pandha, M.D. Ph.D., University of Surrey; Kevin Harrington, M.D. Ph.D., The Institute of Cancer Research, London.

 

 

 

 

 

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