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Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post Thu, Jan 2 1:26pm · View  

Reversing Breast Cancer With Injectable Nanoparticles

A Mayo Clinic researcher, along with collaborators from Harvard Medical School, developed a method to first identify a breast-cancer-promoting gene and then specifically target this gene with a nanoparticle-based, injectable therapy that reverses breast cancer in mice.  The results, published this week in Science Translational Medicine, may provide a first step in developing a new non-surgical treatment option for patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer.   

Milk ducts in cancer-prone mice are packed with tumor cells (deep purple cells, shown by arrow), causing the ducts to grow fatter. But milk ducts in mice treated with a gene-silencing nanoparticle remain mostly hollow (right, shown by arrows), like healthy ducts. Credit: Amy Brock

“Precancerous [...]

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Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post Thu, Jan 16 10:14pm · View  

Luring Cancer: Custom “Bait” Catches Recurrent Prostate Cancer

From Mayo Clinic's Discovery's Edge magazine

LuringCancer1-300x194

Many prostate cancer survivors live in fear of being told that their cancer has returned. It’s even scarier to be told that the doctor knows the cancer is there because of rising PSA levels, but that he can’t find it. Doctors and patients alike know that early detection of the recurrent cancer is critical to the patient’s chance of beating it a second time.

The problem, however, is locating it.

A Mayo Clinic research team has developed a new imaging technique that can often find the recurrent disease months, if not years, earlier than other imaging techniques. Prostate cancer uses choline, a B-complex vitamin, as [...]

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Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post Mon, Dec 9 2013 · View  

Mayo Clinic Debuts Two New Blogs Focused on Celiac Disease and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

 

We are excited to unveil Mayo Clinic’s newest blogs, which focus on celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, which includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis).

The blogs feature commentary from Mayo Clinic experts about most recent news and advances within each disease, specifically:

  • Study findings
  • News alerts
  • Clinical trials
  • Upcoming events
  • Disease management tips from clinicians

The content produced on these blogs is meant to spur discussion and our contributors look forward to answering any questions left in the comment section of blog posts or YouTube videos.

We also encourage our readers to use the comment section of posts to propose any topics they would like to see discussed in future [...]

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Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post Mon, Dec 2 2013 · View  

The Radiation Limbo: How Low Can We Go?

From Mayo Clinic's Discovery's Edge magazine

Reducing radiation exposure from CT scans has become one of the primary goals of Mayo Clinic’s CT Clinical Innovation Center. Dr. Cynthia McCollough and her colleagues are doing the Radiation Limbo: How low can they go without sacrificing image quality.

At a time when CT scans are being used with greater frequency, the work of Mayo researchers has cut the risk of exposure without sacrificing image quality or diagnostic capability.

Dr. McCollough is continually looking for ways to lower radiation exposures while maintaining the needed quality. A critical step in that process includes better defining what level of image quality is needed. [...]

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Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post Mon, Nov 25 2013 · View  

Mayo Clinic's Fifty Years of Kidney Transplants – Part IV

Pioneers of Kidney Transplantation at Mayo Clinic

James H. DeWeerd, M.D.

The first transplant of a kidney took place in Saint Marys Hospital on Nov. 25, 1963. Surgeons George A. Hallenbeck, M.D., and James DeWeerd, M.D., headed a medical team that performed the first transplant, placing a kidney in a female patient. The patient’s half-sister was the donor. Mayo’s operation reflected a common theme in the early development of transplant medicine. The donor providing the kidney was a close relative of the recipient. That was important at the time to minimize rejection of the organ by the recipient’s body.

George A. Hallenbeck, M.D.

George [...]

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Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post Mon, Nov 25 2013 · View  

Mayo Clinic – Fifty Years of Kidney Transplants – Part III

The Numbers, for the Record

Candidates on waiting list for kidneys for transplant (national) - Approximately 97,000

Kidney Transplants at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic - Number of Kidney Transplants (as of June 30, 2013)

Rochester ( since 1963) - 4,822

Arizona (since 1999) -  1,974

Florida (since 2000) -  1,186

Kidney transplant patients at Mayo Clinic are cared for after surgery at special houses. The first, on the Rochester, Minn., campus was called the Gift of Life Transplant House.

Rochester businessman Ed Pompeian knew the personal difficulties of kidney transplants as he worked to create the Gift of Life Transplant House. He had undergone two transplants.

Pompeian envisioned a home-away-from-home atmosphere, to be shared by patients who needed a place to stay while at Mayo Clinic for transplant surgeries. The Gift of Life Transplant House opened in Rochester, Minn., in December [...]

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Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post Mon, Nov 25 2013 · View  

Mayo Clinic and 50 Years of Kidney Transplants – Part II

[Editor's note: We recently looked at benchmarks in kidney transplant history. Today more on the kidney and why it's so important.]

The Kidney’s Critical Role

The kidney’s well-being is essential for the rest of the body. It acts as the main filtering system for wastes and the major factor in excreting them from the body.

With each heartbeat, about one-fifth of the blood supply floods into the kidney. The organ contains enormous numbers of “nephrons’’ containing microscopic tubes. They are sized precisely to strain undesirable waste chemicals from the blood stream.

Each human has two kidneys and easily can survive with a single one. But various genetic diseases, infections or poisons can destroy the nephrons in both kidneys.

Once the kidneys are incapacitated, the damage is life- threatening. Doctors today [...]

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Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post Mon, Feb 17 5:56pm · View  

Fifty Years of Kidney Transplants at Mayo Clinic

Fifty years ago, the prognosis for a patient with kidney failure was threatening to grim.

Transplants of kidneys from one person to another were not mainstream medicine. In fact, a transplant was so extraordinary that TIME magazine described the treatment as “the most daring of all.”

Kidney transplants still are serious operations today. But, since Mayo Clinic’s first transplant in 1963, the surgeries have become accepted medical practice. In many cases, transplantation now is the treatment of choice for patients whose kidneys are failing. It often is preferred over chronic “hemodialysis,” which relies on an artificial kidney outside the patient’s body to filter the blood and prolong life.

Mayo transplant teams have used advances in surgical techniques, drugs that suppress rejection and, of course, experience with thousands of [...]

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Ron Vinson (@abbey123) responded:

My husband is on dialysis, and interested in a transplant.. How do we go about this? Thank you, Carol Vinson

Posted Mon, Feb 17 at 5:56pm CDT · View
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Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post Fri, Nov 22 2013 · View  

Detecting and Treating Cancer Recurrence in Time

A Mayo Clinic laboratory study has revealed a possible mechanism to stop recurrence of cancer in mice. The approach, involving screening and a second-line treatment, prevented cancer from coming back in most of the mice in the study in which recurrence would have happened. The findings appear in Nature Medicine.

It’s been long known that cancer tumors change their appearance or phenotype, as well as their genomic characteristics, to avoid the natural immune response from the host body. A collaborative international team led by Richard Vile, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic molecular medicine researcher, attempted to detect or anticipate that shift and then initiate a “pre-emptive strike” before the tumor fully evolves, thus preventing a relapse.

The researchers say the findings may lead [...]

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Admin (@hinadmin) published a blog post Tue, Nov 12 2013 · View  

Reducing the Panic of Fecal Incontinence

From Mayo Clinic's Discovery's Edge magazine

Imagine the distress of waiting in a stalled checkout line, the bathrooms located at the back of the store, when your bowels begin to rumble and you have the uncontrollable urge to go. For those with fecal incontinence, panic ensues with the very thought of being caught unprepared at moments like these.

Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist Dr. Adil Bharucha has heard too many stories from his patients, mainly women over 40, about the panic created by the inability to control bowel movements, causing stool to leak unexpectedly from the rectum. In the worst cases, fecal incontinence can lead to a complete loss of bowel control.

Since one in 10 women [...]

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