Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog

Share this:
November 13th, 2017

Research Roundup—October 2017

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Young

The Mayo Clinic Research News Roundup includes brief summaries and links to research news releases from the past month. It also connects readers to related resources. Read on for more information from Mayo Clinic Research.

October 2017

woman measuring her waistThe average weight gain for women in their 50s and 60s is 1.5 pounds per year. For this group of women, much of that weight gain resides in the midsection. This type of fat is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, which is also the No. 1 cause of death for postmenopausal women. In addition to cardiovascular disease, central weight distribution puts this population at risk for abnormal glucose and lipid levels and high blood pressure.

A review of the weight gain risks and challenges faced by women in midlife has led Mayo Clinic researchers to a series of recommendations for this patient population. The findings were published in the October edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Stressed young female medical doctor sitting at the desk in office.Despite growing problems with psychological distress, many physicians avoid seeking mental health treatment due to concern for their license. Mayo Clinic research shows that licensing requirements in many states include questions about past mental health treatments or diagnoses, with the implication that they may limit a doctor's right to practice medicine.

These findings also were published in the October edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

a stem cell researcher working with specimens in the labThe National Institutes of Health has renewed one of Mayo Clinic’s largest government research grants for five more years, ensuring support for clinical and translational research and training through 2022. The grant supports Mayo researchers in translating discoveries to address unmet patient needs, while engaging physicians and scientists at all levels.

 

Oxford UniversityMayo Clinic, the University of Oxford, and Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust have signed an agreement to work together, driving advances in medical research and patient care. This agreement will underpin collaboration in all areas of innovation.

Mayo Clinic and Oxford will bring together their respective expertise to improve patient care, make scientific discoveries and educate the health care providers and researchers of the future.

 

The first students in Mayo Clinic's Regenerative Sciences Training Program are, from left, Emma Goddery, Paige Arneson and Christopher Paradise. Seeking to spur development of innovative medical breakthroughs, Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences has started one of the nation’s first doctoral (Ph.D.) research training programs in regenerative sciences.

The Regenerative Sciences Training Program will prepare the next generation of scientists to accelerate the discovery, translation and application of cutting-edge regenerative diagnostics and therapeutics.

3D image of the female reproductive systemA group of international cancer researchers led by investigators from Mayo Clinic and University of New South Wales Sydney has found that the level of a type of white blood cell, called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, present in the tumors of patients with high-grade ovarian cancer may predict a patient’s survival. Results of the study by the Ovarian Tumor Tissue Analysis Consortium were published October 12 in JAMA Oncology.

medical staff with patient in proton beam therapy processA study led by Mayo Clinic researchers has found that proton beam therapy, in combination with chemotherapy, prior to surgery, may be a better option than a combination using traditional radiation therapy techniques with chemotherapy when treating elderly patients with esophageal cancer. Standard X-ray radiation therapy techniques include 3-D conformal radiation and intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

Results were presented October 24, by Scott Lester, M.D., a radiation oncologist at Mayo Clinic, at the fourth-annual Particle Therapy Cooperative Group ─ North America Fourth Annual Conference in Chicago.

Alzheimer's medical illustration of amyloid plaquesResearchers have known for several years that being overweight and having Type 2 diabetes can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. But they’re now beginning to talk about another form of diabetes: Type 3 diabetes. This form of diabetes is associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Type 3 diabetes occurs when neurons in the brain become unable to respond to insulin, which is essential for basic tasks, including memory and learning.

A new study led by Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic neuroscientist and Mary Lowell Leary Professor of Medicine, connected this to a variant of the Alzheimer’s gene known as APOE4. Their findings are published in Neuron.

###

Find research feature stories, videos and news on Discovery's Edge, Mayo Clinic's online research magazine.

Cancer-related stories of hope and healing can be found in Forefront, the online version of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center's magazine.

Mayo Clinic Radio's 1-minute and in-depth discussions of research and practical patient information can be found online or via your local radio station.

Much of our content is available in Spanish as well.

Tags: About, medical research, News Releases, research, Research News Roundup

Comment

Please login or register to post a comment.
Contact Us · Privacy Policy