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December 26, 2017

Mayo Clinic at the American Society of Hematology

By Elizabeth Zimmermann

Every year, the American Society of Hematology (ASH) hosts an annual meeting to highlight groundbreaking scientific research and the latest advances in patient care.

The Society cites its mission as furthering "the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disorders affecting the blood, bone marrow, and the immunologic, hemostatic and vascular systems, by promoting research, clinical care, education, training, and advocacy in hematology."

Mayo Clinic has long had a strong presence at ASH, and 2017 was no exception. Below are brief summaries and links to the news releases we sent out during the conference, which was held in Atlanta, Dec. 9-12.

An observational study by researchers at Mayo Clinic has found that increasing physical activity not only decreased the risk of death from all causes but also decreased the risk of death specifically from lymphoma. Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system, the part of the body's germ-fighting network which includes the lymph nodes (lymph glands), spleen, thymus gland and bone marrow. Lymphoma can affect those areas as well as other organs throughout the body. Study results were presented during the 59th American Society of Hematology annual meeting in Atlanta by Priyanka Pophali, M.B.B.S., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic.

A study by researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida, has found that barriers to patients receiving stem cell therapy as part of their treatment for multiple myeloma include income, education, insurance status and access to care at an academic center or facility that treats a high volume of patients.

“Stem cell transplants are a standard treatment for patients with multiple myeloma and have been shown to benefit patients by delaying the recurrence of disease and, in some cases, improving patient survival,” says Sikander Ailawadhi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida and the lead investigator of this study. “While stem cell transplant utilization for patients with multiple myeloma has increased for all racial and ethnic subgroups over time, population-based studies have repeatedly shown that certain racial minorities are less likely to receive it.”

Dr. Ailawadhi and his colleagues decided to explore factors that determine stem cell transplant utilization among patients from minority communities to better understand the issue and come up with solutions to eliminate barriers and improve access for all patients.

A group of investigators from Mayo Clinic and multiple academic research centers in Italy have identified a genetic model for predicting outcomes in patients with primary myelofibrosis who are 70 years or younger and candidates for stem cell transplant to treat their disease. The group’s findings were presented today at the 59thAmerican Society of Hematology annual meeting in Atlanta by lead authors Alessandro Vannucchi, M.D. from the University of Florence and Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic.

In findings presented to the American Society of Hematology, Mayo Clinic researchers found that using emojis instead of traditional emotional scales were helpful in assessing patients’ physical, emotional and overall quality of life. Researchers found that using iPhones and Apple Watches were favored by patients, and the technology helped collect study data accurately and efficiently. The study, created using Apple’s ResearchKit framework, showed that Apple Watch provides objective, continuous activity data that correlates with established cancer patient-reported outcomes.

The study was led by Carrie Thompson, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic.

You can visit the conference website to find the full listing of Mayo Clinic research presented at ASH 2017.

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Tags: American Society of Hematology, ASH, Ayalew Tefferi, Carrie Thompson, emojis, Findings, Florida, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, myelofibrosis, Priyanka Pophali, Sikander Ailawadhi, stem cell transplant

COMMENT

michaelfox
@michaelfox

Posts: 1
Joined: Jan 25, 2018
Posted by @michaelfox, Thu, Jan 25 10:42am

Nice article

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