Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog – an eclectic collection of research- and research education-related stories: feature stories, mini news bites, learning opportunities, profiles and more from Mayo Clinic.

Share this:
April 10, 2018

New international practice guidelines for using tamoxifen to treat breast cancer

By Colette Gallagher

An international group of clinicians and scientists representing the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) published the first-ever clinical practice guideline for using CYP2D6 genotype to guide tamoxifen therapy in Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Tamoxifen is a hormonal agent used for the prevention and treatment of premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer that is estrogen receptor positive. CYP2D6 genotype is an inherited factor that alters the metabolism of tamoxifen.

“The goal of the CPIC Guideline for CYP2D6 and tamoxifen therapy is to provide clinicians information that will allow the interpretation of clinical CYP2D6 genotype tests so that the results can be used to guide prescribing of tamoxifen when genotype information is available,” says Matthew Goetz, M.D., a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist, who is the lead author. “The consensus of the consortium tamoxifen group was that there was sufficient evidence to use CYP2D6 genotype to assist with clinical recommendations for women who are being considered for tamoxifen for early stage estrogen receptor positive breast cancer.”

Matthew Goetz, M.D.

Tamoxifen is converted through the process of liver metabolism into forms that result in greater anti-estrogenic potency and anti-tumor activity than the parent drug. Antiestrogens are a class of drugs which prevent estrogens from mediating their biological effects in the body.

"The work of the consortium is an example of Mayo’s commitment to taking a comprehensive, collaborative team science approach to deliver advanced genomic medicine to our patients. We work with other academic medical centers, hospitals, and clinics to bring the latest discoveries to improve the practice of medicine." - Matthew Goetz, M.D.

“The work of the consortium is an example of Mayo’s commitment to taking a comprehensive, collaborative team science approach to deliver advanced genomic medicine to our patients. We work with other academic medical centers, hospitals, and clinics to bring the latest discoveries to improve the practice of medicine,” says Dr. Goetz.

Tags: breast cancer, Center for Individualized Medicine, DNA sequencing, Findings, genetic testing, Matthew Goetz, People, precision medicine

Please login or register to post a reply.
Contact Us · Privacy Policy