Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog – an eclectic collection of research- and research education-related stories: feature stories, mini news bites, learning opportunities, profiles and more from Mayo Clinic.

Share this:
January 8, 2019

Research News Roundup-December 2018

By Elizabeth Zimmermann

Each month, we publish Mayo Clinic's Research News Roundup. This post includes brief summaries and links to news releases from the preceding month that discuss some of our latest medical research. It also connects readers to related resources.

December's news releases highlight some of the wide variety of research being conducted in Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. The below findings were presented at two of the top annual international cancer symposia.

Read on for recent findings of Mayo Clinic Research:

Research led by oncologists Roberto Leon-Ferre, M.D. and Charles Loprinzi, M.D. of Mayo Clinic has found that the drug oxybutynin helps to reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flashes in women who are unable to take hormone replacement therapy, including breast cancer survivors. These findings were presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

“Hot flashes are a common symptom of menopause and can be even more severe in breast cancer survivors than they are in the general population,” says Dr. Leon-Ferre. He says several factors contribute to the increased severity of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors including exposure to chemotherapy, which may bring on early menopause; the use of antiestrogen drugs, such as tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors; and the use of medications or procedures to suppress the function of the ovaries. Hormone replacement therapy, which is sometimes used to treat hot flashes, is generally not recommended for breast cancer survivors. “Hot flashes not only impact a patient’s quality of life, they are associated with patients prematurely discontinuing breast cancer treatment, which may increase the risk of breast cancer recurrence and mortality,” says Dr. Leon-Ferre. “It is important for physicians to have effective options to treat hot flashes.”


Mayo Clinic researchers have developed two new strategies that may improve the performance of chimeric antigen receptor therapy (CAR-T cell therapy) in treating cancer. They are presenting results of their preclinical research at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Diego.

Read more about CAR-T cell therapy at Mayo Clinic.


Mayo Clinic researchers have found that an oral drug, apixaban, used to treat blood clots in patients undergoing cancer therapy, is safe and effective. The drug was associated with fewer major bleeding events and fewer recurrent blood clots, compared to low-molecular- weight heparin. Their findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology by Robert McBane II M.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

“Nearly 1 in 5 patients with cancer will develop a clot in the veins, referred to as either a deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism,” says Dr. McBane. “Clotting events can be deadly with pulmonary embolism being the second most common cause of death in cancer patients.”

###

More from Mayo Clinic:

Tags: blood cancer, blood clots, cancer, CAR-T, Charles Loprinzi, hematology, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, menopause, News, Research News Roundup, Robert McBane II, Roberto Leon-Ferre

Please login or register to post a reply.
Contact Us · Privacy Policy