Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog – an eclectic collection of research- and research education-related stories: feature stories, mini news bites, learning opportunities, profiles and more from Mayo Clinic.

December 3, 2019

Research News Roundup–November 2019

By Elizabeth Zimmermann

The Mayo Clinic Research News Roundup includes brief summaries and links to research news releases from the past month. It also connects readers to related resources. Read on for more information from Mayo Clinic Research.

stem cell trial patient Chris Barr in shorts and a t-shirt, smiling and standing a clinic exam room with Dr. Mohamad Bydon and wife Debbie Barr looking on

Stem cells derived from a patient's own fat offer a step toward improving — not just stabilizing — motor and sensory function of people with spinal cord injuries, according to early research from Mayo Clinic.

A clinical trial enrolled 10 adults to treat paralysis from traumatic spinal cord injury. After stem cell injection, the first patient demonstrated improvement in motor and sensory functions, and had no significant adverse effects, according to a case report published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.


closeup photo of hands of older person, loosely folded on table

Mayo Clinic-led study involving 3,276 patients has found that people with inflammatory bowel disease, Type 1 diabetes or blood clots may be at increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.

The study, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, also found that people who have rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of developing heart disease, blood clots and sleep apnea.


graphic of carbon ion beam breaking up a DNA strand

Mayo Clinic and Hitachi, Ltd. have reached an agreement in principle to build a carbon ion treatment facility as part of Mayo Clinic's recently announced integrated oncology facility which will be constructed at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida.

While carbon ion therapy was discovered in the United States in the 1970s, there currently are no carbon ion therapy treatment centers in North America. The technology is only available at a handful of centers in Asia and Europe. Read a related news article on Wired.com.

Steven Buskirk, M.D., chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Florida says, "the availability of carbon ion technology will allow Mayo Clinic researchers to evaluate the efficacy of carbon ion therapy for the treatment of various cancer types including exploration into new and expanded therapies, including multi-modality treatment options."


photo of Mayo Clinic building in Arizona

Mayo Clinic in Arizona has been recognized as a Center of Excellence for Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS), the second medical center in the U.S. to earn that distinction.

Enhanced Recovery After Surgery aims to improve care of surgery patients and enhance postoperative recovery through implementation of evidence-based practice, audit, education and research. Protocols that have been developed emphasize a culture of inclusivity and recognition of the importance of multidisciplinary collaboration.

Since implementing ERAS protocols, Mayo Clinic in Arizona has reported decreased lengths of hospital stays, and fewer complications and readmissions, while achieving significant cost savings. Among other achievements, the Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery has reported a 70% reduction in narcotic use postoperatively over the past three years.


stock image of female doctor holding toy red heart

Twice-yearly injections of an experimental cholesterol-lowering drug, inclisiran, were effective at reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, often called bad cholesterol, in patients already taking the maximum dose of statin drugs, according to data of the ORION-10 trial presented Saturday, Nov. 16, at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2019.

High levels of LDL cholesterol — which builds up in the walls of the arteries, making them hard and narrow, thereby leading to blockages — causes increased risk of heart attacks and strokes.


stock image of a row of adults sitting on yoga mats, turning towards their back

A Mayo Clinic study published in the American Journal of Health Behavior investigates differences in how men and women perceive their own health. The study finds that confidence in maintaining good health habits can be influenced by gender.

Men reported higher levels of physical activity and greater confidence in their ability to remain physically active, according to the study, which surveyed 2,784 users at the Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center, an employee wellness center. Men and women had comparable levels of confidence that they would maintain a healthy diet.

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Find research feature stories, videos and more news on Discovery's Edge, Mayo Clinic's online research magazine.

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Information about many of the clinical trials available across Mayo Clinic is online as well.

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Tags: arthritis, cancer, carbon ion therapy, cardiology, cholesterol, diabetes, heart attack, IBD, inflammatory bowel disease, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, neurology, News, oncology, radiology, Research News Roundup, rheumatology, spinal cord injury, stem cells, Steven Buskirk, stroke, women's health

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