Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog – an eclectic collection of research- and research education-related stories: feature stories, mini news bites, learning opportunities, profiles and more from Mayo Clinic.

March 3, 2020

Research News Roundup–February 2020

By Elizabeth Zimmermann
closeup of lab equipment arranged on table

Each month, we publish Mayo Clinic's Research News Roundup. This article includes brief summaries and links to news releases from the preceding month that discuss some of our latest medical research and/or research education. It also connects readers to related resources.

Read on for recent findings of Mayo Clinic Research:

aerial photo of the Mayo Clinic campus in Florida

John Thrasher, president of Florida State University, and Mayo Clinic representatives signed a multifaceted agreement on Tuesday, Feb. 25, in Jacksonville to attract and retain top talent in the biomedical field.

The collaborative education efforts will focus on medical innovation and promote a market-driven approach to create a highly trained workforce focused on taking medical technology from the research space to clinical practice.


grandmother and granddaughter having a conversation

Diabetes affects nearly 1 in 10 adults in the U.S., of these millions, more than 90% have Type 2 diabetes. Controlling blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin levels ― or HbA1c, which is sometimes referred to as A1C ― is key to diabetes management and necessary to prevent its immediate and long-term complications. However, new Mayo Clinic research shows that diabetes management may be dangerously misaligned.

The new study, published in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, shows paradoxical trends in overtreatment and undertreatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes.


artistic image depicting aspects of the health care applications of artificial intelligence

An approach based on artificial intelligence (AI) may allow EKGs to be used to screen for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the future. With hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the heart walls become thick and may interfere with the heart's ability to function properly. The disease also predisposes some patients to potentially fatal abnormal rhythms. Current EKG technology has limited diagnostic yield for this disease.

New Mayo Clinic research suggests that a convolutional neural network AI can be trained to detect unseen characteristics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The standard 12-lead EKG is a readily available, low-cost test that can be performed in many settings, including those with limited resources.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is one of the leading causes of sudden death in adolescents and young adults participating in sports.


seated elderly woman with hand on chest

COPD is a chronic lung disease that makes it difficult to breathe. COPD is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., with more than 15 million people currently living with the disease, according to the American Lung Association.

In a new paper published Feb. 4 in JAMA, Mayo Clinic researchers describe the benefits of in-home noninvasive ventilation therapy ― which includes a type referred to as bilevel positive airway pressure, or BiPAP ― for many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The team identified a number of benefits, including reduced mortality, fewer hospital admissions, lower risk of intubation, improved shortness of breath, and fewer emergency department visits.


view of the trunk of a younger woman in pajamas, with her hands over her heart, not smiling

Men and women differ in the way their vascular systems age and the rate at which atherosclerosis ― the hardening of artery walls or buildup of arterial blockage ― progresses over time. These sex- and age-related differences have a direct bearing on a woman's risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with international investigators, suggest a new approach of evaluating vascular function earlier in women, starting in middle age before arterial damage becomes severe. Amir Lerman, M.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, is senior investigator on the study. This study, "Endothelial Vascular Function as a Surrogate of Vascular Risk and Aging in Women," was recently published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

####

Meet our researchers and check out the research and education that after 150 years, continue to provide the underpinning for the first and largest integrated, not-for-profit medical group practice.

Mayo Clinic Radio's 1-minute and in-depth discussions of research and practical patient information can be found online or via your local radio station.

Information about many of the clinical trials available across Mayo Clinic is online as well.

Some content is available in Spanish, and we also have news and patient resources in PortugueseMandarin Chinese and Arabic.

STAY CONNECTED — Advancing the Science

  • If you enjoyed this article, you might want to subscribe for regular updates.
  • If you want to share this story with friends, social media links are at the top of the article.
  • And if you want to see other recent stories on the blog, the index page is a great place to start.

Tags: Amir Lerman, artificial intelligence, biomedical research, cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular medicine, COPD, diabetes, education, Findings, Florida State University, heart disease, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, medical research education, News, OptumLabs, pulmonary and critical care medicine, Research News Roundup, women's health

Please login or register to post a reply.
Contact Us · Privacy Policy