Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog – an eclectic collection of research- and research education-related stories: feature stories, mini news bites, learning opportunities, profiles and more from Mayo Clinic.

August 7, 2020

Research News Roundup — July 2020

By Elizabeth Zimmermann
research lab, multiple people, woman in foreground holding/examining test tubes. PPE including mask and face shield

It sometimes seems that summer has flown by without any significant achievements, and only incremental evidence building in the topic of the moment. COVID-19 has had a major dampening effect on social interaction, one doesn't need to be a researcher to figure that out. However, biomedical and health care delivery research have not paused for more than a moment or two - and some scientists have found themselves inundated, where previously their work pace was predictable.

Mayo Clinic researchers are no exception, as they strive to find answers to questions raised by the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19. They also continue to investigate health system problems, chronic conditions and diseases that have plagued people since long before the latest coronavirus came to town.

Below are excerpts and links to news articles relating some of the recent research findings coming from Mayo Clinic Research & Education. The second section includes Spanish translations of some of these and other recent research news.


Dear Mayo Clinic: My brother was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma a few years ago and has had several recurrences. I was reading about something called chimeric antigen receptor-T cell therapy (CAR-T cell therapy) and was wondering how it works and if he might be a candidate for it? Read answer.


The concept of herd immunity has sparked debate about whether it would control the spread of COVID-19. Herd immunity happens when a sufficient proportion of a population is immune to an infectious disease, meaning spread from person to person is unlikely.

So what is known about immunity and COVID-19? On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. S. Vincent Rajkumar, a Mayo Clinic hematologist and researcher, discusses how the body works to fight off disease. Listen, share, subscribe online.


Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings suggest phage therapy could provide a potential treatment for managing such infections, including those involving antibiotic-resistant microbes.

The research is published in the July issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases (CID).


Answer: With all the talk about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) testing in the news, it's not surprising that there's confusion about tests and how they differ. Antibody testing determines whether you had COVID-19 in the past and now have antibodies against the virus. A test to diagnose COVID-19 determines if you currently have the disease. Here's what you need to know about testing. Read the answer online.

Researchers at Mayo Clinic are studying the effects of a tissue-derived bioactive gel they developed to improve endovascular embolization – a minimally invasive procedure used to treat bleeding blood vessels and aneurysms.

The results of their latest preclinical study are published in the journal Advanced Materials.


Mayo Clinic medical personnel in scrubs, white jackets and protective face masks in a hospital corridor having a conversation. 2 in blue scrubs, 2 in white coats, other staff passing in background.

Noticias en español

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All COVID-19 news and information from Mayo Clinic is collected online in a single location.

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Tags: antibodies, bacteriophages, basic science, blood clots, CAR-T, COVID-19, discovery research, Findings, immunity, News, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, phage, Progress Updates, prosthesis, Research News Roundup, Vincent Rajkumar

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