Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog – an eclectic collection of research- and research education-related stories: feature stories, mini news bites, learning opportunities, profiles and more from Mayo Clinic.

Findings

If the article talks about a research paper, use this category

January 17, 2019

RIGHT 10K: Blazing a trail to health care’s future

By Susan Buckles susanbuckles

Article by Barbara Toman This article originally appeared on the Center for Individualized Medicine blog Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine (CIM) is nearing the finish line of the first stage of its unique RIGHT 10K study—an effort that doesn’t involve running shoes but nevertheless is paving the way to prescribing medications matched to a […]

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Tags: Center for Individualized Medicine, Eric Matey, genetics, Jessica Wright, pharmacogenomics, RIGHT 10K study


January 14, 2019

New algorithms help predict diabetes treatment failure

By Advancing the Science contributor advancingthescience

Metformin is the recommended first line treatment for type 2 diabetes, and is often used to prevent progression of prediabetes to diabetes. Unfortunately, it will not work for over one third of patients who take it, a condition called “therapeutic failure.” Historically there has been little way of knowing whether a patient will or will […]

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Tags: artificial intelligence, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, diabetes


January 9, 2019

Why doctors might need to go back to 6th grade

By Elizabeth Zimmermann elizabethzimmermann

When you leave the hospital, following an injury, stroke, surgery or other event, you are loaded down with paper. You receive instructions on how to take care of your body. They tell you how to prepare your home and your family. Other pages include directions on what medication to take, when and how. For example, […]

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Tags: Asad Choudhry, care transitions, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Martin Zielinski, surgical outcomes


October 1, 2018

How Bread Yeast and Book Damage Help Clarify Epigenetics

By Sara Tiner saratiner

Genes don’t change, but how they are used by the body can.  That shift in use (which is called epigenetics) can mean the difference between illness and health. To better understand how that happens Mayo researchers are examining how genes are activated (used) and copied. With a recent publication in the journal Science, a team […]

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Tags: Center for Individualized Medicine, Chuanhe Yu, DNA, epigenetics


September 27, 2018

Research helps play it safe in the ICU

By Elizabeth Zimmermann elizabethzimmermann

ICU use of PTZ/VAN combo therapy safe for kidneys Life threatening infections, or sepsis, are one of the most common reasons people end up in the intensive care unit or stay longer in the hospital than originally expected. To combat these infections, physicians can choose from several antibiotics, and often will use a combination of […]

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Tags: Center for Clinical and Translational Science, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Diana Schreier, Erin Barreto, pharmacy


September 25, 2018

Can geology upend decades of medical wisdom about kidney stones?

By Advancing the Science contributor advancingthescience

Article by Alex Generous Like stones formed in nature, kidney stones show signs of being partially dissolved and remade.  Implication: there may be a way to remove kidney stones without surgery or passing them in urine. An unlikely collaboration between a geologist at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and researchers at Mayo Clinic has overturned […]

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Tags: Jessica Saw, John Lieske, kidney, Michael Romero, nephrology, urology


September 13, 2018

The rising tide of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

By Elizabeth Zimmermann elizabethzimmermann

Liver disease? Me? I don’t drink. I don’t smoke. Okay, so I don’t exercise that much, and where did all these candy bar wrappers come from? Anyway, I thought liver disease was just for alcoholics? These are question many Americans ask when diagnosed with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. But as its name implies, NAFLD is […]

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Tags: Alina Allen, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, OptumLabs, Rochester Epidemiology Project


September 4, 2018

Research News Roundup-August 2018

By Elizabeth Zimmermann elizabethzimmermann

The Mayo Clinic Research News Roundup includes brief summaries and links to research news releases from the past month. It also connects readers to related resources. Read on for more information from Mayo Clinic Research. Mayo Clinic researchers identify a potential new approach to treat HER2 positive breast cancer Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified an important […]

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Tags: breast cancer, deep space medicine, Fergus Couch, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Michelle Freeman, Molly Jeffery, opioids, Purna Kashyap, Research News Roundup, Taro Hitosugi, weight loss, William Freeman


August 30, 2018

Knock, knock, the nurse practitioner is here

By Elizabeth Zimmermann elizabethzimmermann

When Burt Ramaker left the hospital following a successful hip replacement, he didn’t plan to go back any time soon. He and his wife Ardis imagined they would spend time at a skilled nursing facility to get him back on his feet, and then they’d be back at their waterfront cabin. Instead, they found themselves […]

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Tags: care transitions, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Rozalina McCoy


August 22, 2018

Shedding light on the ‘sunshine vitamin’

By Advancing the Science contributor advancingthescience

Vitamin D, sometimes referred to as the ‘sunshine vitamin,’ comes up frequently in the clinical setting. Over the last few decades, we have learned that vitamin D may actually have a much broader role in human health than once thought. A deficiency in vitamin D is very common, mainly due to limited sun exposure in […]

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Tags: Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Daniel Dudenkov, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Rochester Epidemiology Project


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