Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog – an eclectic collection of research- and research education-related stories: feature stories, mini news bites, learning opportunities, profiles and more from Mayo Clinic.

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Mayo Clinic research and research education news

February 14, 2019

Using brain organoids to uncover causes of neuropsychiatric disorders

By Colette Gallagher colettegallagher

Mayo Clinic and Yale University collaborated in a study published in Science to create a new model for studying neuropsychiatric disorders in early human brain development. This unique collaboration brought together Mayo Clinic’s team-based, patient-centered research with Yale researchers to discover and analyze the genetic mechanisms that may cause these disorders. The Mayo Clinic team, […]

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Tags: Alexej Abyzov, autism, Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic


February 13, 2019

Coping with the “work of being a patient”

By Caitlin Doran caityrosey

There’s no getting around it: being a patient is hard work. And it gets even harder for patients living with multiple chronic conditions. This “work” is made of up all the responsibilities and tasks doctors ask patients to take on in order to access and use health care and in order to successfully carry out […]

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Tags: capacity coaching, Kasey Boehmer, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, minimally disruptive medicine, shared decision making


February 12, 2019

Mayo Clinic discovery advances potential individualized treatment for mesothelioma

By Susan Buckles susanbuckles

Large chromosomal rearrangements present in mesothelioma could make it possible to understand which patients are likely respond to immunotherapy,  researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine  have discovered. The research is published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. “What we’ve shown so far is that these large complex chromosomal rearrangements are frequent in […]

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Tags: Aaron Mansfield, basic science, cancer, Center for Individualized Medicine, DNA, genomics, George Vasmatzis, immunology, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, mesothelioma


February 11, 2019

Zooming in on Colon Polyps

By Kate Ledger k8ledger

Gastroenterologists agree that removing a colorectal polyp is an important step in preventing colon cancer, but one challenge has been excising polyps that are large, particularly those that are flat and more than an inch in diameter. A recently introduced minimally-invasive approach, called endoscopic mucosal resection, or EMR, facilitates the removal of large polyps without […]

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Tags: cancer prevention, colon cancer, colon polyp, gastroenterology, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Michael Wallace


February 7, 2019

Eva Galanis, M.D.-Bitten by the virotherapy bug

By Advancing the Science contributor advancingthescience

Every day more than 1,600 Americans die from cancer. Most of them have cancer that can’t be cured with traditional methods — surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. The father of Evanthia Galanis, M.D., was one of them. He died in the late 1990s from melanoma when his daughter was a junior faculty member at Mayo Clinic. “My father would have […]

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Tags: basic science, cancer, clinical trials, Eva Galanis, gene therapy, hematology, immunotherapy, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, measles virus, oncology, SPORE, virotherapy


February 5, 2019

Research News Roundup-January 2019

By Elizabeth Zimmermann elizabethzimmermann

The Mayo Clinic Research News Roundup includes brief summaries and links to research-related news releases from Mayo Clinic in the past month. It also connects readers to associated resources. Read on for more information from Mayo Clinic Research. Minnesota Partnership awards 5 collaborative research grants Diabetes, stress-induced aging and Alzheimer’s disease, immigration-related obesity, and implantable drug […]

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Tags: artificial intelligence, basic science, biomarkers, cancer, cervical cancer, clinical trials, concussion, heart failure, hockey, James Kirkland, Kathy MacLaughlin, Kogod Center on Aging


January 31, 2019

New data gives clarity to allergy doctors and their patients

By Elizabeth Zimmermann elizabethzimmermann

In a new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Mayo Clinic researchers present the first population-based evidence showing how often food allergies are diagnosed in people. The study also determined which foods are most likely to cause allergic reactions in different age groups. “There were no previous population-based estimates for food allergies in the U.S.,” […]

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Tags: allergies, Avni Joshi, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, epidemiology, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, population health, research, Rochester Epidemiology Project


January 15, 2019

A hard look at a devastating heart disease

By Kate Ledger k8ledger

Though rare, cardiac sarcoidosis is a condition that can wreak havoc on the heart. It can be triggered by environmental or infectious agents and is characterized by an overactive immune response, involving clusters of white blood cells that aggregate in heart tissue. Those clusters can result in the need for a pacemaker, and may even […]

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Tags: cardiology, heart failure, Leslie Cooper


January 14, 2019

New algorithms help predict diabetes treatment failure

By Advancing the Science contributor advancingthescience

Metformin is the recommended first line treatment for type 2 diabetes, and is often used to prevent progression of prediabetes to diabetes. Unfortunately, it will not work for over one third of patients who take it, a condition called “therapeutic failure.” Historically there has been little way of knowing whether a patient will or will […]

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Tags: artificial intelligence, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, diabetes


January 10, 2019

Gene therapy: potential and pitfalls

By Susan Buckles susanbuckles

Research is advancing gene therapy as a possible treatment or eventual cure for genetic diseases that bedevil modern science. Gene therapy was conceived over 20 years ago, and until recently, remained largely in the research lab. But gene therapy products are now beginning to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for clinical […]

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Tags: Center for Individualized Medicine, David Deyle, gene mutation, gene therapy, Saad Kenderian


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