Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog – an eclectic collection of research- and research education-related stories: feature stories, mini news bites, learning opportunities, profiles and more from Mayo Clinic.

Progress Updates

October 23, 2019

Regeneration for all

By Jennifer Schutz Jennifer Schutz

With growing public awareness and broader academic engagement, the prospect of pioneering a change in disease management has propelled the field of regenerative medicine. The ability to build, scale and apply biotherapeutic technologies and solutions that are not cost prohibitive will become increasingly important elements that drive progress in regenerative medicine. In a recently published paper, […]

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Tags: Andre Terzic, Atta Behfar, biomanufacturing, Center for Regenerative Medicine, stem cells


October 16, 2019

Advances in IBS Research Target Dietary Burdens

By Advancing the Science contributor Advancing the Science contributor

By Sara Nick The number one reason to miss school or work in the U.S. is the common cold. Number two? Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a disorder of the large intestine that can cause cramping, pain, gas, constipation, and diarrhea.   “IBS is incredibly prevalent, affecting about 1 in 7 adults,” says Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist […]

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Tags: Brian Lacy, gastroenterology, gut health, IBS, irritable bowel syndrome


October 14, 2019

BEAUTY Update: Progress in breast cancer research

By Advancing the Science contributor Advancing the Science contributor

By Barbara J. Toman Chemotherapy is a standard breast cancer treatment, used for aggressive biology breast cancer to shrink tumors in the breast and lymph nodes before surgery, assess response and destroy any undetected cancer cells elsewhere in the patient. But some breast tumors don’t respond well to chemotherapy, putting patients at high risk of […]

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Tags: breast cancer, cancer, Center for Individualized Medicine, chemotherapy, clinical trials, genetics, genomics, individualized medicine, Judy Boughey, Liewei Wang, Matthew Goetz, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center


September 26, 2019

Bioartificial liver: Bridge to liver regeneration

By Jennifer Schutz Jennifer Schutz

The liver has the greatest regenerative capacity of any organ in the body. However, when the liver is injured beyond its ability to regenerate itself, and a transplant is not readily available, there are few options for patients. Led by Scott Nyberg, M.D., Ph.D., researchers are refining their own version of a bioartificial liver, known as […]

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Tags: bioartificial liver, Center for Regenerative Medicine, regenerative medicine, research, Scott Nyberg, stem cells, transplant


September 24, 2019

Research for infants with HLHS moves forward

By Jennifer Schutz Jennifer Schutz

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a complex and rare heart defect present at birth in which the left side of a child’s heart is severely underdeveloped. At Mayo Clinic, physicians and researchers in the Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome are looking for ways to delay or even prevent heart failure for […]

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Tags: Center for Regenerative Medicine, clinical trials, HLHS, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pediatric cardiology, stem cells


September 12, 2019

Behind the scenes–Mayo Clinic Research

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Elizabeth Zimmermann

Everything health care has to offer for patients is the result of research and education related to that research. At Mayo Clinic, research drives everything we do, resulting in evidence-based treatments and continuous improvements in the way patients, caregivers and others experience health care. At Mayo Clinic we share information about our programs and projects […]

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Tags: biomedical ethics, CAR-T, cardiology, cellular therapy, clinical trials, dialysis, Ian Lanza, Januario Castro, kidney disease, medical research, metabolism, neurology


August 6, 2019

Researching stem cell therapy for hemorrhagic stroke

By Jennifer Schutz Jennifer Schutz

Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in the U.S., striking nearly 800,000 people each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the last decade, there has been preclinical research that led to a small number of early phase clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a possible treatment to reverse […]

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Tags: Center for Regenerative Medicine, regenerative medicine, research, stem cells, stroke, Toni Turnbull, William Freeman


July 1, 2019

Community preparedness for future outbreaks: Lessons from whooping cough

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Elizabeth Zimmermann

Lately the news has contained many stories of illness or death that could have been prevented by vaccination. Although in 2019 the stories have mostly been about measles, in 2016 it was pertussis, or whooping cough, as it was in 2012, and 2004-2005. The Centers for Disease Control estimates 24.1 million cases of whooping cough […]

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Tags: Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Chung-Il Wi, epidemiology, Euijung Ryu, immunization, personalized medicine, pertussis, Rochester Epidemiology Project, vaccines, whooping cough, Young Juhn


June 12, 2019

Mayo Clinic researchers dig deeper to map brain tumors

By Advancing the Science contributor Advancing the Science contributor

Surgeons in the operating room must achieve a delicate balance when removing a brain tumor: eradicate as much of the cancer as possible, and avoid injury to parts of the brain responsible for motor control, speech, and more. For years, doctors have been using brain mapping – that is, stimulating the brain with electrodes to […]

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Tags: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Anthony Ritaccio, brain, brain cancer, brain tumor, Kaisorn Chaichana, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, medical innovation, neurology, William Tatum


June 3, 2019

Hear from the experts on hereditary amyloidosis

By Advancing the Science contributor Advancing the Science contributor

Amyloidosis is a rare disease that occurs when a substance called amyloid builds up in your organs. Amyloid is an abnormal protein that is produced in your bone marrow and can be deposited in any tissue or organ. Hereditary amyloidosis (familial amyloidosis) is an inherited disorder that often affects the liver, nerves, heart and kidneys. […]

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Tags: amyloidosis, hereditary diseases, neurology, P. James Dyck


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