Advancing the Science

Mayo Clinic Medical Science Blog – an eclectic collection of research- and research education-related stories: feature stories, mini news bites, learning opportunities, profiles and more from Mayo Clinic.

Items Tagged ‘surgical outcomes’

May 12, 2020

Melanoma surgery: When more isn’t necessarily better

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Elizabeth Zimmermann

When you have a chance for an extra scoop of ice cream, that extra might be nice. If you are trying to fit into last summer’s bathing suit, another inch off is probably welcome. However, if you’re having surgery to remove melanoma, like Goldilocks choosing a bowl of porridge, you want a procedure that’s ‘just […]

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Tags: Aaron Spaulding, Antonio J. Forte, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, dermatology, Maria Huayllani Peralta, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, melanoma, plastic surgery, Sanjay Bagaria, surgery, surgical outcomes


January 16, 2020

Patient-centered research originates across health care

By Advancing the Science contributor Advancing the Science contributor

Patient-centered research. It’s this kind of research that leads to practice transformation – improving outcomes, costs and overall experience with health and health care. And patients are the reason Kirsten Holbrook, a supervisor in the Respiratory Care Department, Mayo Clinic Health System Eau Claire, Wisconsin, decided to conduct a research project. Holbrook and her multidisciplinary […]

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Tags: cardiology, Christopher Williams, Mayo Clinic Health System, Muhammad (Adeel) Rishi, patient experience, pulmonary and critical care medicine, research, surgical outcomes


January 8, 2020

Dropping ‘rarely abnormal’ blood tests could save $9 million per year, Mayo research finds

By Adam Harringa Adam Harringa

Routine blood tests that are given the day after colon or rectal surgery turned up abnormal results 4% of the time. Furthermore, of those patients with abnormal results, only 1% warranted follow-up action, new research from Mayo Clinic has discovered.

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Tags: blood test, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Elizabeth Habermann, health care value, health sciences research, medical research, Nicholas McKenna, Robert Cima, surgery, surgical outcomes


December 17, 2019

Mayo Clinic innovator inspired by patients, surgical experience to improve medical devices

By Advancing the Science contributor Advancing the Science contributor

By Sandy Shortridge Like so many Mayo Clinic staff members, Kenneth Dye has been inspired by Mayo Clinic patients throughout his career. In Dye’s case, conversations with two prolific inventors — while they were patients at Mayo Clinic — sparked his interest in finding ways to improve medical devices. The inventors encouraged Dye to pursue his interest […]

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Tags: anesthesiology, artificial heart, biotechnology, cardiology, Kenneth Dye, medical innovation, Neil Feinglass, patient safety, surgery, surgical outcomes


October 4, 2019

Chemo first for better outcomes in bile duct cancer, says new research

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Elizabeth Zimmermann

Oncology care teams frequently use chemotherapy along with surgery to treat cholangiocarcinoma, or bile duct cancer. However, until now, little evidence existed regarding if and when receiving chemotherapy was likely to have the best effect. Recently Mayo Clinic researchers found that patients who received chemotherapy before surgery to remove their bile duct cancer were more […]

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Tags: Amit Mahipal, bile ducts, cancer, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, chemotherapy, cholangiocarcinoma, gastrointestinal cancer, hematology, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, oncology, rare disease, Siddhartha Yadav


June 4, 2019

Research News Roundup-May 2019

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Elizabeth Zimmermann

The Mayo Clinic Research News Roundup includes brief summaries and links to research- and research education-related news releases from the past month. It also connects readers to additional resources of relevance. Read on for more information from Mayo Clinic Research. Mayo experts to present findings at Digestive Disease Week 2019 Mayo Clinic researchers are among […]

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Tags: arthritis, autoimmune disorder, breast cancer, clinical trials, Cornelius Thiels, gastroenterology, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, minimally invasive surgery, neurology, ophthalmology, opioids


January 9, 2019

Why doctors might need to go back to 6th grade

By Elizabeth Zimmermann Elizabeth Zimmermann

When you leave the hospital, following an injury, stroke, surgery or other event, you are loaded down with paper. You receive instructions on how to take care of your body. They tell you how to prepare your home and your family. Other pages include directions on what medication to take, when and how. For example, […]

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Tags: Asad Choudhry, care transitions, Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Martin Zielinski, surgical outcomes


August 3, 2017

Mayo researchers seek to manage pain while minimizing opioid prescriptions

By Adam Harringa Adam Harringa

For decades, the emphasis nationwide for treating surgical patients was to prescribe enough opioid pain medication to ensure they didn’t have any pain. But health care providers are realizing it’s a balancing act between managing pain and ensuring patients aren’t overprescribed.

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Tags: Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Cornelius Thiels, Elizabeth Habermann, Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education, opioids, Robert Cima, surgery, surgical outcomes, Tad Mabry


March 9, 2017

Researchers study benefits of stretching ‘microbreaks’ for surgeons

By Adam Harringa Adam Harringa

Many surgeons spend prolonged periods in awkward positions, which increases safety concerns for patients, and can lead to long term medical ailments and burnout for doctors. So Mayo Clinic researchers have a team of surgeons performing “microbreaks” of 90 seconds or two minutes of stretching every 20 to 40 minutes. The result for many surgeons […]

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Tags: Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, health care systems engineering, physician burnout, population health, surgery, surgical outcomes


July 5, 2016

The July Phenomenon

By Meghan Knoedler Meghan Knoedler

“Never go to the hospital in July,” a phrase often repeated by patients; and perpetuated by a myriad of hospital employees, casts a worrisome tone over care received in July. Thus we hear of the “July Phenomenon.” This is because each July 1 is the start of the medical residency year. A day full of […]

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Tags: Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Cornelius Thiels, education, patient experience, surgical outcomes


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